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Family Planning, Money, and Health | Catholic Life

Family Planning, Money, and Health

Some of the comments on my recent post on family planning reminded me of how differently I think from a “typical” American–whomever that is. I completely understand the idea of discounting money when having a child because there is never enough money. But perhaps my parents trained me so well in this regard that applying this logic to myself would lead to the sins of self-indulgence and irresponsible parenting.

In my mind one does not have enough money to have a child (in the US) if one does not have enough money to pay for nutritious food for the child, and more immediately for the pregnant mother.

For me it would seem incredibly virtuous and self-sacrificial for a couple to delay children under such a circumstance, even if it did mean never having children.

It is sometimes a challenge for me to remember that the rest of the (good, conservative) Catholic world (in the United States) views children so very differently than I do. I view children as a supreme gift from God, and in many cases the greatest blessing of marriage.

Others seem to view children primarily as an obligation which can only be avoided for grave reason. And so, while I am inclined to think of what I need to do in order to be adequately prepared for the awesome privileged of being a parent, others are inclined to think of whether they have a good enough reason to get out of being a parent.

I am sure that all of my dear readers are now judging me as judgmental (and I’ll post more about that another time) so I feel the need to explain that I do not presume to know enough about others to have any idea of how they make their actual choices (talk, especially online, does not necessarily correspond that closely to behavior in reality). All I know is the implications based on what they say to me, and the tremendous sins into which I would fall if I accepted their counsel. This is, as usual, all about how I think.

For me, it seems that sex is so connected to procreation that it is irresponsible to engage in sexual intercourse without first considering whether one has sufficiently prepared for the likelihood of conception following from that act. It seems to me that basic justice would dictate that if one has not taken basic steps needed for responsible parenthood, then one should abstain from the act which would lead to the conception of a child who would be hurt by one’s lack of responsibility.

We are not currently able to fully eradicate miscarriage or congenital disorders. But we can take the basic steps necessary to dramatically reduce them. To me it would be basic responsibility to ask myself whether I have been able to take care of my body (and my spouse’s) for the last few months in order to do what is reasonably possible to reduce harm to any child who might be conceived. If the answer was that no and I had not been able to get adequate nutrients (particularly in the past several weeks–think of the importance of folate etc. preconception), or that my husband has not (months ago) been able to consume the nutrients that we know are necessary for preventing miscarriage, then I would consider myself obligated to abstain from sex if it were at all likely to result in conception.

Because of my understanding of responsibility, and justice, it is difficult for me to see how others can think of engaging in conjugal intercourse as nothing more than an issue of generosity. It is certainly an issue of generosity, but for those of us who believe that sexual intercourse must irrevocably be tied to procreation, it is about so very much more than simply having sex when we like and generously accepting whatever God happens to throw our way.

I know that for many of us simply having a child is the best way for us to mature to the point of loving self-sacrificially. But I do not think that that means that we need to ignore the reality of the ideals of justice and responsibility and hold up thoughtless sexual activity as the standard of generosity.

So, while I can appreciate the idea of not expecting a perfect moment for a baby (and certainly letting go of the idea that one needs to have the next 18+ years paid for!), I do not find the counsel to ignore finances to be universally sound advice.

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33 Responses to “Family Planning, Money, and Health”

  1. Michelle 05. Jun, 2011 at 3:30 pm #

    I made one of those comments referring to the fact that I’d received that sort of advice. I never said I completely heeded it head-on, simply that was the only advice I could remember receiving.

    That being said, one of the things that has always weighed heavily on my husband and me as we discern whether to be open to another baby or not has been the idea that each of us is and has been intended by God at this time and in this circumstance. Is that not one of the things we are taught through our faith? That God’s plan is perfect and unalterable and that regardless of finances, social standing, economic hardships or economic booms…that each soul created by God is completely intended for that part of the world and that time? Maybe I am confused about the theology behind that, though.

    I definitely think finances should NEVER be ignored…and that perhaps considering that in with the other things to consider with regards to family size is just one way God communicates with those of us who ask him. At the same time, I have heard of people who are absolutely afraid when they find out they have conceived a new child in abominable financial circumstances, but by the end of the pregnancy and the birth of the child, those circumstances have at least taken steps to be resolved through a blessing unforseen and some hard work on the couple’s part.

    I think discerning family size is something that happens on a cycle by cycle basis for a couple and is never something we should set out to say, “I want 7 kids, so that must be God’s will for me” and then pursue every way of accomplishing that. Sometimes things get in the way. For example, my sister has always…since she was young (teens) said she yearned to have five children. She has three and the last one landed her in the hospital with several life-threatening conditions. And she now is coming to the realization that perhaps it is most prudent to avoid adding to their family due to the fact that it would be imprudent to deprive her three living children (all under age 8 ) of their mother.

    I guess all that to say that I still believe, over all, that God is completely in charge no matter how hard we humans, with our imperfect souls and imperfect discernment, try to be completely in charge.

    • Michelle 05. Jun, 2011 at 3:32 pm #

      Ummm, that smiley face was supposed to be an 8 followed by the end parenthetical. Sorry!!

      • Rae 05. Jun, 2011 at 4:37 pm #

        I don’t know why it does that! I edited your comment to add a space so that it wouldn’t turn it into that face.

    • Rae 05. Jun, 2011 at 4:37 pm #

      I think I agree with you. And I didn’t think that anyone was passing on bad advice, I just felt like sharing how odd some of it is when I consider applying it directly to my life.

      And the idea that we’re all ultimately part of God’s plan concept can work both ways. It would not only mean that everything will be fine with the children who are born (in an eternal way, though not necessarily here on earth!) it would also mean that we don’t have to worry about having too few children, because we obviously can’t prevent someone whom God intends to be here.

      So ultimately I agree with your last paragraph. We can do the best that we can do with discernment, but we’ll never get it exactly right and we have to accept that we’re (thank God!) not ultimately in charge.

      • Michelle 05. Jun, 2011 at 5:27 pm #

        Yes, it does go both ways…and thank God that we are not ultimately in charge…I have thought about it so many times and the things I might not have given myself in this life due to the fact that I didn’t think I could handle it, but now, looking back, feel so blessed to have experienced. :)

  2. Rebecca @ TRH 05. Jun, 2011 at 7:25 pm #

    Ok, I think I love you! THIS is what I was trying to say with my ‘just cause’ posts.

    I once had someone tell me that they thought that I had just given way more thought to having children than most people do – and I thought to myself ‘well, obviously, do you see how many people have children that they didn’t plan for or complain about constantly?’. I can be rash and jump into things without thinking, but having children has always been something that I’ve seen as a HUGE responsibility (not just financially) and have very seriously considered. Even when I was on The Pill, it was very much because I was quite convinced that I was in no way ready for this responsibility.

    I always said that when the desire for children outweighed my *fear* (for lack of a better word) of them, then I would know I was ready for the responsibility that would come with them. The only thing I never considered was how I would deal with the responsibility of not being able to have them on *my* time frame. I see know that that needs to be as much a piece of the equation as every thing else.

    • Kathleen 06. Jun, 2011 at 5:28 am #

      Oooh….having complained about my children quite vociferously lately, I must clarify that no matter how beautiful, beloved our “job” is (whether that’s motherhood or something else), there are always times when love is something you DO and not something you FEEL. And the frustrations of parenting are real. Sometimes my m-i-l has scolded me for complaining: “You wanted these children SO DESPERATELY.” And she’s right. But it would be unreal to expect that any person, no matter how badly they want children, can go through life without complaining.

      I just felt I had to respond, being someone who is definitely guilty of complaining, even after having gone through the pain of infertility and being desperately hurt by people who complained about their kids in my face when I wanted them so badly. Hope all this makes sense…

      • Rebecca @ TRH 06. Jun, 2011 at 7:01 am #

        Oh, no! I didn’t mean the day-to-day complaining, I would expect every mom is guilty of that. Sorry for the confusion. I guess just working in child care/education I hear the constant complaining that truly makes me wonder why some of these people have children.

        Ugh! I totally didn’t mean that to sound like parents who have *any* complaints should be included.

        I think I am perfecting the art of putting my feet in my mouth :-/

        • Rae 06. Jun, 2011 at 3:02 pm #

          I think you’re both fine! Comments can just be confusing sometimes. Like when I saw Kathleen’s comment in my inbox and since I can’t tell from the email when a comment is in reply to another comment I was very confused trying to figure out what I had said that made her feel the need to “clarify.” 😀

  3. Young Mom 05. Jun, 2011 at 7:29 pm #

    I agree that people should use common sense with finances and babies, and taking care of our bodies. However, I still kind of feel that you can never be fully “ready” to have children. If I had been honest with myself back when I got married, I never would have had kids as soon as I did. Even now, I am afraid that I will hurt my kids because of all the healing I am still doing, and I regret the bad descisions I have already made in childrearing. I’m grateful that I had the kids I did right away, because if I had waited until I was ready, I’m not sure if I would ever conquer that fear of being an “imperfect” parent. I think it’s all part of an illusion of control, as if we can somehow force the people and circumstances in our lives to conform to our plan. We can’t. Even in the case of nutrition while pregnant or nutrition for your child. You could have a picky child who can’t handle the textures of the healthy foods you prepare for them, or you could be like me during my first 3 pregnancies and be unable to keep ANYTHING in your stomache for the first half of the pregnancy. Did I have plans to eat protein and kale and take my pre-natal vitamins? Yes. But when I was throwing up 20 times a day, I was happy when I could keep down a little gaterade and a few blueberries. We can make our plans, and take every descision seriously. But in the end life kind of just happens and there isn’t really a while lot we can control.

  4. Claire 06. Jun, 2011 at 11:24 am #

    What Kathleen and Young Mom said! My 7+ years of parenting have been more out-of-control than anything else. I definitely know now that I was (and am) not ready for this parenting gig, especially because of that personal healing that Young Mom mentioned that I still desperately need (but never fully realized beforehand). But since God DID know how messed up I am, I think He was irresponsible to give me these kids and I complain to Him incessantly about that. (I am joking about God being irresponsible, I am not joking about complaining about it.)

    :)

  5. Rae 06. Jun, 2011 at 3:15 pm #

    Young Mom and Claire, I suppose I always need more disclaimers, but I in no way intended to convey the idea that one must somehow be perfectly “ready” in order to parent. I also know that there is no way one can control the vast majority of what happens with pregnancy or parenting. I believe that is precisely why we need to also encourage people to be mature about what they *can* control.

    I have seen far too many young mothers talk on and on about how how control is just an illusion and women are called to be open to life (meaning have sex whenever they feel like without concern for the consequences), while the truth is that they are falling completely apart and using the “no one is ever a perfect parent” at first as a justification for selfish behavior, and ultimately as a coping device until they completely breakdown (and I’m talking real nervous breakdowns, abandoning families etc.).

    I know that I can’t control things like morning sickness. But I can control things like not having sex before I get married, having a long engagement, having health insurance in order to get quality prenatal care, and abstaining for many months if need be in order to space out pregnancies and give my body time to replenish nutrients and recover (all somewhat random examples of things well within our control).

    I don’t think that encouraging openness to life and trust in God (and joy in God’s love and grace and gifts for which we could never be “good enough”) means that we should ignore the serious call to responsible parenthood. And I am afraid that that is what happens many times.

    I think that it is crucial for you to share your journeys toward grace with others, but there are many confused women out there who may mistake your dismissal of “control” as a dismissal of responsibility.

    • Young Mom 06. Jun, 2011 at 5:29 pm #

      Coming from my background, I completely get what you are talking about. The flippant attitude towards children drives me crazy. While I don’t feel that life is truly controllable, I am very serious about providing a god life for my kids, and to me that means far more than just providing food and health care! :)

      • Rebecca @ TRH 06. Jun, 2011 at 6:25 pm #

        Way more than food and health care :) – you know I think you are an awesome mom and that you’re voice on gentle discipline is so so SO important!

  6. Rebecca @ TRH 06. Jun, 2011 at 3:48 pm #

    I too agree – I don’t think you’re ever completely ‘ready’, heck, we’d love nothing more than to see a positive pregnancy test right now and I still have a list of things that I would say need worked on to be ‘ready’ – most of which won’t be completely done anytime soon. And as Rae said, I’m glad I’m not ultimately in control – even though I’d like it if God would hear my side of this one, just a little bit ;).

    I think for me it’s just there needs to be at least some realization that kids are a big deal, and not just something we are entitled to or that can be thrown away, and as a whole, that is where our society as gone (ex. abortion and IVF). I think in the ‘catholic circle’ that we blog in, we are all much more alike than we realize and we end up splitting hairs on tiny details. (Saying this with a smile :) – truly). By our very nature of being open to life and respecting life we ‘get it’ more than the culture at large (generalizing here, I don’t think Catholics have the monopoly on ‘getting it’).

    So, as Rae said in her last paragraph, we may come across to others (non-Catholics as a generalization), as if we don’t have any sense of responsibility, but in fact, we take it much more seriously than others realize.

    Yikes I’ve rambled, I’ve just been thinking about this most of the day trying to figure out why it comes out all jumbled and realized that maybe, I’m preaching to the choir :).

    • Real 30. Jul, 2014 at 10:52 pm #

      I couldn’t agree more about gearitrics. I miss sitting with some of the elderly individuals I used to help and they would tell me stories for hours about the things that they witness when they were younger, and the lives that they lived up to the point that they needed care. I have always felt that the elderly know how to live their lives better than anyone, and they for sure never take it for granted! Sometimes the people taking care of them are not good people though, and it always breaks my heart to see someone talking badly to an elderly man or woman.I like how you made a switch from little tiny babies that have no real experience with life, to elderly men and women who have lived life to its fullest and still have more life to share with others. Such opposites!

    • Veronica 18. Feb, 2015 at 12:11 pm #

      Dear Susan,I have been considering doing the Daniel fast and found your wtsibee concerning it. Several years ago the Lord led me to do a similar eating plan. I felt the Lord say that I did not have a golden calf in my life, I had a chocolate-sugar coated calf that consumed by thinking as I bowed down to it on a very regular basis. I called this way of eating my no sweets, no meats diet. I did it for about 1 1/2 years. I was amazed at how good I felt. NOTHING could have ever convinced me that sugar made me tired until I stopped eating it and found out how much more energy I had. I also noticed how much more clearly I heard the voice of God and equated at least some of it with the fact that I felt so much better physically. I recently went to full time work when my husband became disabled. This change has left me grasping for convience and our eating habits are nothing like they used to be. I long to eat better but do not know where to begin. Just last year my husband was diagnosed with Crohn’s disease which has made eating even more of a challenge. I am interested in learning about the Daniel fast for my own life but was wondering if you knew how, or if, to approach such change when a person has Crohn’s disease. Can you give me any information about this subject? The medical doctors and community have been no help. Often they suggest that he eat pudding, jello and mashed potatoes. I am very concerned about the lack of nutrition he receives on a daily basis. I don’t know where to turn.Blessings!Dee

  7. alison 10. Jun, 2011 at 8:03 pm #

    Just a quick question. From your understanding of responsibility and justice, do you think its irresponsible for older mothers to try to get pregnant if they are at a higher risk for miscarriage? Just curious because your stance seems to be one of, if you haven’t accurately prepared for pregnancy to the utmost point so that you minimize your chance of miscarriage to some acceptable level based on modern science, then you’re being irresponsible. I guess I can’t see anyway you don’t think that after reading this post, but it just seems like a very extreme measure to call 40+ year olds making love during fertile time ‘thoughtless sexual activity”.

    • Rae 11. Jun, 2011 at 12:17 pm #

      Not at all. I think that there are many, many factors that go into being responsible, and they are for a couple to prayerfully decide for themselves. It is not any individual risk category that should decide these things. I am not taking issue with any objective risk based on modern science. I simply happen to believe that responsibility requires us to look at our individual situations and make the wisest choices possible based on our particular circumstances in life. Responsibility isn’t about others making the choices that I would make, it is about them wisely considering the connection between sexual intercourse and procreation and taking their particular circumstances into serious account when deciding what is appropriate for them sexually.

      I did my best to use personal pronouns when I was specifically referring to the requirements of responsibility and justice as I understand them for me, and I can see how that could confuse you. But if there is something else that you’re taking issue with, then maybe you can quote the specific parts and I can explain? Because I don’t at all see where I said what you seem to reading.

  8. alison 13. Jun, 2011 at 8:54 am #

    It was in your 7-10 paragraphs.

    “To me it would be basic responsibility to ask myself whether I have been able to take care of my body (and my spouse’s) for the last few months in order to do what is reasonably possible to reduce harm to any child who might be conceived. If the answer was that no and I had not been able to get adequate nutrients (particularly in the past several weeks–think of the importance of folate etc. preconception), or that my husband has not (months ago) been able to consume the nutrients that we know are necessary for preventing miscarriage, then I would consider myself obligated to abstain from sex if it were at all likely to result in conception.

    Because of my understanding of responsibility, and justice, it is difficult for me to see how others can think of engaging in conjugal intercourse as nothing more than an issue of generosity. It is certainly an issue of generosity, but for those of us who believe that sexual intercourse must irrevocably be tied to procreation, it is about so very much more than simply having sex when we like and generously accepting whatever God happens to throw our way.”

    and specifically this last sentence

    “But I do not think that that means that we need to ignore the reality of the ideals of justice and responsibility and hold up thoughtless sexual activity as the standard of generosity.”

    It seemed that a general counsel (“Don’t wait until you have enough money….you’ll never have enough money”) was refuted by considering a specific case of how parental health is more important as it concerns subsequent conception and also, how your views are different than the average Catholic. So I was just asking about a specific case of parental health that can never be changed by eating right or taking vitamins. While a younger couple could have the illusion that they were doing all they could to prepare and that fits your criteria of “justice and responsibility”, an older couple, or say, a couple who knows that they are at risk for passing on certain diseases they are carriers of could never minimize that risk based on their inherent situations. I feel like you’re trying to apply specific situation advice and make it general with broad sweeping claims of justice and responsibility, so I’m just trying to follow it out to its natural conclusion based on your similar train of thought.

    And I ask because you write that you have a different way of thinking about these things than the average catholic – the subject of this post – so I am curious how would you view those justice and responsibility in those situations? In your view, by avoiding conception those people are acting responsibly because it would be their fault if they conceived a child with some defect:, right? You can assume personal pronouns if you like, but my guess was that you would promote abstinence and adoption in those situations. Or you can ignore this if you didn’t want to take the conversation here, it just seemed like this was a natural direction based on what you were describing in this post.

    • Rae 13. Jun, 2011 at 4:08 pm #

      “So I was just asking about a specific case of parental health that can never be changed by eating right or taking vitamins.” Then that has to be considered by the couple on the basis of all factors involved in their individual situation. My point was not that anyone has to be responsible in a particular way, it just does not fit with my understand of what the Church *actually* teaches to focus solely on sexual intercourse as an act of generosity (hey, we can never really *afford* to be generous, so just don’t worry about the consequences!) and neglect the other important aspects of justice and responsibility and the most essential self-giving that shows itself in self-denial.

      This isn’t about crunching specific numbers to make up general rules. It is about remembering the general rules of responsibility that already exist.

      So I don’t get the “While a younger couple could have the illusion that they were doing all they could to prepare and that fits your criteria of “justice and responsibility”, an older couple, or say, a couple who knows that they are at risk for passing on certain diseases they are carriers of could never minimize that risk based on their inherent situations.” I am not taking about absolute risks. I am talking about responsibility for an individual couple.

      “I feel like you’re trying to apply specific situation advice and make it general with broad sweeping claims of justice and responsibility, so I’m just trying to follow it out to its natural conclusion based on your similar train of thought.” This might the point of confusion. I’m actually trying to do the opposite: to take the sweeping truths of justice and responsibility which the Church teaches and show how they would contradict the “just focus on generosity and don’t worry about the consequences” implicit in the advice to just have babies without counting the costs.

      As I said, we can never eliminate all risks, but we can always do what we can do. We can always live up to the call of responsibility in our own lives. And generosity is never to be neglected, but it must not be misused as an excuse for self-indulgence. And the “you’ll never be able to afford babies” often turns into “so just have sex whenever you like without considering the consequences” advice for newlyweds. Which is a problem because it misses the other crucial parts of the teaching.

  9. Young Mom 13. Jun, 2011 at 12:56 pm #

    Actually, Alison brings in an interesting point. I have a good friend who’s father died of Huntingtons disease, and there is a %50 chance that she could have it, which means a %50 chance of passing it on to her own kids. And she and her husband decided to get married and have a baby anyways. Is that horribly irresponsible? Your arguementation in the paragraghs she points out, kind of sounds alot like the rational for aborting babies with disabilities.

    • alison 13. Jun, 2011 at 1:20 pm #

      In her defense, I think this piece reads more like rationale for just saying, take extreme measures with NFP which will likely result in lots of abstinence, in order to avoid having a child. But yeah, I think it brings up the point of what we’re really culpable of, which is definitely a gray area.

    • Rae 13. Jun, 2011 at 4:33 pm #

      Remembering that sex is inherently tied to procreation, and doing the best that one can to maturely prepare to parent prior to indulging in sex = aborting babies with disabilities?

      So you would assert that NOT thinking about sex as related to procreation and pretending that we have NO control (and thus no responsibility) for the consequences is the prolife stance?

      I assume that you’re NOT implying that your friend was thoughtlessly ignoring the known realities of her situation. So, the only way that I can possibly make sense of your reply given my second assumption that you actually read what I wrote, is to think that your view of welcoming children into the world is closer to the LDS view than the Catholic view? In that case, I think we can agree to disagree since that is far outside what I can address here.

      • Young Mom 13. Jun, 2011 at 5:36 pm #

        I realize that you are not making that point (obviously) but I do think that some of the language you’ve used could be taken in an incorrect way. I’ve heard many people argue that it is completely irresponsible to continue a pregnancy if that child shows signs of disability. You said that you would never dream of having a baby if you hadn’t taken the correct supplements and eaten healthily for several months before. I’ve heard people say that they would never dream of having a baby if they aren’t financially ready, or in the perfect relationship, or whatever. The question remains what if pregnancy happened regardless of efforts to prevent it? I can assume that as a Catholic you would not abort, even if your plans were thrown off. But that is not the case for many other people who use the same words you used here to describe their own mentality towards pregnancy and children.

        • Rae 13. Jun, 2011 at 5:55 pm #

          ” You said that you would never dream of having a baby if you hadn’t taken the correct supplements and eaten healthily for several months before.” No, I didn’t say that.

          I said “We are not currently able to fully eradicate miscarriage or congenital disorders. But we can take the basic steps necessary to dramatically reduce them. To me it would be basic responsibility to ask myself whether I have been able to take care of my body (and my spouse’s) for the last few months in order to do what is reasonably possible to reduce harm to any child who might be conceived. If the answer was that no and I had not been able to get adequate nutrients (particularly in the past several weeks–think of the importance of folate etc. preconception), or that my husband has not (months ago) been able to consume the nutrients that we know are necessary for preventing miscarriage, then I would consider myself obligated to abstain from sex if it were at all likely to result in conception.”

          I cannot think of any words to describe any virtue that have not at times been misused. Many of your words are the same as those used to justify abdication of parental responsibility and child abuse. But that does not make me think that that is what you are advocating.

          The issue of language is completely off-topic, but I am very interested in what you think is the appropriate way to talk about this subject since you apparently find the concepts of responsibly and justice to be inherently problematic?

          • Young Mom 13. Jun, 2011 at 8:20 pm #

            Sorry. I guess I was getting to hypothetical by observing argumentation styles and word choice. I’m not sure how to argue this subject, I have never tried to write on it. I see no problems with responsibility and justice in approaching pregnancy and parenting. I can’t understand how I could write something that sounds as though I am advocating for child abuse or neglect, but that’s pretty awful if that is the case.

      • Anchik 31. Jul, 2014 at 11:54 am #

        That was the first Young Fresh Fellows song I ever heard, on the Towson State University radio station, years berofe any member of my family moved to the wild & woolly northwest.

    • Joshua Michael 13. Jun, 2011 at 4:50 pm #

      In traditional moral theology, the goodness of an act depends both on the ends and the means. The end of “making sure that we are prepared to parent any children we have” is good. So the thing that makes a difference is how we go about achieving that end.

      Killing babies: bad means.
      Contraception: bad means.
      Choosing not to have sex sometimes: good means.

    • Alonso 31. Jul, 2014 at 11:55 am #

      I have no idea what my first YFF song was, but the first songs I actually rembmeer listening to as a kid were Pure Prairie League’s Amie and Billy Joel’s She’s Always a Woman .

  10. suzanne temple 01. Jul, 2012 at 1:47 pm #

    Pius XII allocution to midwives http://www.ewtn.com/library/PAPALDOC/P511029.HTM Read especially the section titled “Birth Control” for a proper understanding of the positive duty of married persons to have children. Also, his letter to large families. http://www.catholicculture.org/culture/library/view.cfm?recnum=5370

  11. Yolanda Cline 13. Nov, 2013 at 6:33 am #

    Scholars disagree on the best legal course forward to address child labour. Some suggest the need for laws that place a blanket ban on any work by children less than 18 years old. Others suggest the current international laws are enough, and the need for more engaging approach to achieve the ultimate goals.

    • Margarette 30. Jul, 2014 at 9:39 pm #

      (I’m not sure if I’m posting this in the corcert place as I was unable to post it from the Dashboard.)The type of physician I would like to work with is a gerontologist. A gerontologist specializes in caring for the elderly. I have a fondness for our older population. They built out society and lived in a time that many of us can learn from. I would take great pride in caring for them as they age. In my opinion, working with a doctor that shares my passion and excitement would be the ideal work environment.The type of physician I would not be as excited to work with would be a proctologist. To be completely honest, I just don’t think I have what it takes to be in that environment. It’s important to be professional in any medical environment. I believe my sense of humor would not allow me to be as professional as I would need to be. I would also prefer not to work with ophthalmologist. Several years ago I spent a week with my grandfather at a specialist to have cataracts removed. I found it very difficult to watch the videos of my grandfather’s up coming procedures. It wasn’t difficult caring for my grandfather after surgery, but I must admit the pre-op was an experience that I would not want to assist in on a daily bases.

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